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I had to see a man about a horse

Your browser does not support the audio element. Colleague 1 : Where are you going? Colleague 2 : What you do not know cannot hurt you. Better that you do not know. Then you have plausible deniability. Friend 1 : After three beer in less than one hour, I need to go see a man about a horse.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Man About a Horse - "A Few Hundred Miles" (Live at 2018 IBMA World of Bluegrass)

see a man about a dog

I always heard it as " I've got to see a man about a dog". Not many horses around where I lived I suppose. And as for titbits There was a magazine in England called Titbits, a sort of gossip magazine I think. Loved reading this I, too, have heard it as "I have to see a man about a horse. Warmest smiles to you as the weekend approaches. I've heard it said about a horse and about a dog. My mother used the expression fairly often. Not much was any of my business. I only knew Sue's explanation: excuse oneself to go the bathroom.

But only men! Mind you, I've heard many expressions to that purpose over the years thanks to working in a male-oriented environment. All equally weird and wonderful. That's a new one for me. I've heard "I've got to see a man about a horse", too. It could have meant anything, but where I'm from it mostly meant you wanted to leave where you were or you had to go to the bathroom.

The men in my family always used the "horse" or the "dog. Being the only lady in a house full of "not-so-gentlemanly" men must have been a trial for her. But, on the other hand, she pretty much ruled the roost, so to speak. Post a Comment. Did you forget we were speaking of old idioms?! I am truly saddened. Both of us had English-born grandfathers, and both of us lived with them for a time. Both grandfathers used the phrase. In my grandfather's context, at least the way that I perceived it, the saying meant: "I have something to attend to, and it's none of your business.

So, who got it right? It turns out that we both did, for the Urban Dictionary lists both definitions. Of course, I humbly note that my version is listed first. This thrills me to me end as I am not used to coming in first. Thankfully however, I am mollified to know that "the last shall be first" on that somewhat postponed meeting in the sky.

These are direct quotes from the answers provided. Some of these answers referred to other internet sources. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr.

Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog. The most common variation is to "see a man about a horse". Almost any noun can be substituted as a way of giving the hearer a hint about one's purpose in departing. During Prohibition in the United States, the phrase was most commonly used in relation to the consumption or purchase of alcoholic beverages.

This has been a useful and usefully vague excuse for absenting oneself from company for about years, though the real reason for slipping away has not always been the same. Of these reasons [ I have used the phrase from time to time, but it doesn't seem to work all that well in the present day, and I haven't used it extensively.

Perhaps I will try harder though, as I like it. Posted by Anvilcloud at am. Newer Post Older Post Home. Subscribe to: Post Comments Atom.

Amidst a tangled web

Listen on SoundCloud. Hint: The answer she gets should tide her over. A caller complains that this last word gives him the willies. Does an alligator alligate? Charny A former West Virginian reports that she grew up hearing a strange word: charny.

Last edited on Feb 15 Excuse me, I have to go see a man about a horse. See more words with the same meaning: to go to the bathroom.

Have you ever stopped to think about some of the English colloquialisms we use and their origin, not to mention why we even use them in the first place? We use these colorful colloquialisms all the time and they are a rich part of our language and for someone who has made a living out of teaching our language, I am sometimes curious as to the origins and usage of some of these expressions. Colloquialisms English Usage. September 20, at am. Your email address will not be published.

see-a-man-about-a-horse

Top definition. See a man about a horse unknown. It means to politely excuse yourself from a situation to go to the restroom or buy a drink. It originated from men disappearing to go bet on horse or dog races. See a man about a dog means the same thing. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog. During Prohibition in the United States, the phrase see a man about a horse was most commonly used in relation to the consumption or purchase of alcoholic beverages. Any general business that needs attending to that you may not care to discuss whith the present party.

Definition of see a man about a horse

Add see a man about a dog to one of your lists below, or create a new one. Improve your vocabulary with English Vocabulary in Use from Cambridge. Learn the words you need to communicate with confidence. Gathering, compiling and analyzing: talking about data 1. Definitions Clear explanations of natural written and spoken English.

When I was living in Spain, I visited a castle with some friends. There were six of us, four guys and two girls, and we split up for a while.

To see a man about a dog or horse is an English idiom, usually used as a way to apologize for one's imminent departure or absence—generally to euphemistically conceal one's true purpose, such as going to use the toilet or going to buy a drink. The original non-facetious meaning was probably to place or settle a bet on a racing dog. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud [2] in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog.

Going to see a man about a horse

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. It seems possibly to be a humorous way to get out of a conversation. Even as a native English speaker, I've never figured out the exact situation you would use this phrase.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: I’ve Got to See a Man About a Horse

I always heard it as " I've got to see a man about a dog". Not many horses around where I lived I suppose. And as for titbits There was a magazine in England called Titbits, a sort of gossip magazine I think. Loved reading this I, too, have heard it as "I have to see a man about a horse.

See A Man About A Horse

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Dec 23, - To see a man about a dog (or see a man about a horse) is an English language colloquialism, usually used as a way to say one needs to apologize for one's  How did the phrase, 'talk to a man about a horse,' come to be.

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Comments: 5
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