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How can my wife use my gi bill

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How to Use Your GI BILL: A Brief Overview of the GI BILL Comparison Tool

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: FYI: Post-9/11 GI Bill Transfer

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There are certain limitations, and new rules passed in July, effective starting Jan 12, require members to transfer their GI bill no later than the end of their 16th year of service. Additionally, all members must be eligible to serve an additional four years in order to transfer their GI Bill benefits to a family member. Those who are thinking about transferring this benefit should do so ASAP to avoid reduced benefits for their children.

Read more about the GI Bill transfer changes. The GI Bill benefits transfer policy is designed as a retention tool to entice mid-career service members to commit to additional military service.

Because of this, eligibility rules target those members based on their service time and eligibility to serve an additional four-year service commitment. New military rules, passed in , require eligible members to transfer their GI Bill no later than the end of their 16th year of service.

This change was originally scheduled to go into effect starting July 12, However, the military recently pushed this back to January 12, , to give more time for military members to make the transfer. This applies to all current military members and their families. Note: Each branch can implement the transfer rules based on DoD policy. Please see your Human Resources or personnel office for more information or to start the transfer of your benefits. Your branch will be able to help you start the transfer process, ensure you are eligible to serve an additional 4 years and help you extend your service commitment.

These changes have been made in keeping with the intent of the GI Bill transfer policy, which is to serve as a retention tool. The original law grandfathered in certain service members near retirement if they were not able to serve an additional 4-year service commitment. The original bill allowed those who. Why this provision was removed: This provision was included in the original law to give all current service members the opportunity to transfer their GI Bill to family members.

This eligibility option has been removed because the GI Bill transfer benefit is a retention tool and all currently serving members will have had the option to transfer their benefits leading up to their retirement eligibility. This provision is no longer necessary. Retirement eligible members can still transfer GI Bill benefits through July 11, , provided they are eligible to extend their service commitment an additional 4 years.

Why this provision was removed: This provision was removed with the policy update. The new policy removed the ability for members to transfer benefits if they cannot extend 4 more years of service. This most frequently impacts those who run into High Year Tenure rules, Time in Grade, mandatory retirement laws, or inability to extend due to medical or administrative reasons.

The provision was removed in keeping with the intention of the GI Bill transfer policy, which is to serve as a retention tool. This is especially true if you are at or near the year mark or have already surpassed the year service mark. After July 12, , you will no longer be able to transfer your benefits if you have surpassed 16 years of service. To top it off, there has been a lot of talk of changing the benefits for dependents who receive the transferred GI Bill benefits.

Under current law, children are eligible to receive the monthly housing allowance when they attend school using the GI Bill. There has been discussion of removing that benefit, as it was intended to help the veteran obtain housing after separating from the military; it was not originally intended to pay for housing for dependents.

The proposal would eliminate the housing allowance for dependents. Remember, you choose how to allocate how your GI Bill benefits are disbursed among your family members and you can revoke or change the allocation at any time.

You can even make changes after you separate or retire from the military. You can always change your mind regarding how you will distribute the months of benefits you transfer. This does not apply to the Montgomery GI Bill program. Transfers must be made while the member is still serving. Members are not eligible to transfer benefits once they have already retired or separated from the military.

Members who transfer their benefits and extend 4 years, but are not able to complete 4 years of service, need to seek guidance from the VA. Policy allows the member to keep their benefits if they are separated due to a medical retirement, disability, or Force Shaping.

However, there may be some instances in which the member may no longer be eligible to transfer the benefits if they are not able to complete 4 years of service. It is recommended each member consult with their Human Resources, Personnel office, or the VA for more information.

The military member can transfer up to 36 months of GI Bill benefits and can allocate them among eligible recipients at any time but only once per month. The benefits belong to the service member, and the intent of the GI Bill transfer program is not to change that. Members are encouraged to transfer benefits if they are eligible to do so because they can always change their mind.

The minimum transfer is one month of benefits. I have 36 months of benefits. I am married with two children. To begin with, I transferred 1 month of GI Bill benefits to each of my dependents , and still have 33 months to use for myself. I can change this allocation of benefits at any time. To make changes, log into your MilConnect account and update the number of months you are transferring to each individual up to the maximum allowed.

This can be found under:. Remember, there is no downside to transferring your benefits because you can always go back and change how the transferred benefits are allocated.

You can add and remove dependents to your GI Bill benefits transfer while you are still serving in the military. However, you can no longer add dependents to your transfer once you have retired. You can only remove benefits or change the allocation between them. Keep this in mind before you separate or retire from the military. The goal of the GI Bill transfer program is to keep mid-career military members in uniform, which is why there are minimum service requirements and why the GI Bill transfer program requires military members to incur more service time.

Once they reach 16 years of service, an additional 4 years will bring them to retirement eligibility and there is no longer a need to entice the members to continue their military service. These GI Bill transfer rules will not apply military members who are eligible for the Post GI Bill, but who have already separated or retired from active duty — all transfers must be made while the member is still in military service.

I am currently in the Army, prior service Navy. My LES says that I have 8 years in service. That means that I will need two more years to be eligible. I am being told that after I transfer my education benefits, I will owe the Army 3 years. How true is that? I am retired from the Military and have been placed in the retired reserve. Hello Karl, the military has always used the GI Bill transfer benefit as a retention tool. Service members have never been able to transfer the GI Bill benefit after they have retired.

The sole purpose of the GI Bill transfer benefit is to entice servicemembers to extend their service commitment so the military can retain mid-career servicemembers. I am no longer active duty. Can I transfer my GI Bill to my daughter? So far as I am aware, you will not be able to transfer your GI Bill, since this can only be done while you are serving on active duty. I would contact the VA to see if there are any benefits available for your children. You may also want to check with your state — each state has different benefits for veterans, so this is something you will need to check on your own — just visit the state office of veterans affairs.

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This site may be compensated through the advertiser Affiliate Program. For more information, please see our Advertising Policy. More information on GI Bill transfer eligibility is found below. Comments I am currently in the Army, prior service Navy. Hello Renata, So far as I am aware, you will not be able to transfer your GI Bill, since this can only be done while you are serving on active duty. I wish you the best, and thank you for your service. Speak Your Mind Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits in a Divorce

The Bill has become even more valuable for military families with a recent addition. This new option permits servicemembers to transfer the GI Bill to a spouse or family member, who can take advantage of the education benefits. Signed into law in and expanded last year, the bill provides education benefits for servicemembers on active duty for 90 or more days since September 10, Now that servicemembers can transfer the GI Bill to a spouse, all or part of any unused education benefits can be gifted as long as the request is completed while serving as an active member of the armed forces. Requests for transfers may be made by any servicemember, officer or enlisted, meeting these requirements:.

In practice, this means that their current enlistment must take them to at least four years from the date of transfer. Many folks find that they need to wait until re-enlistment to transfer their benefits. Spouses may begin using transferred benefits immediately.

Review the content below to find out how you can offer your benefits to someone else, and save them a boat load of money on higher education expenses. What can you do to protect yourself of your loved ones from falling into the student loan debt trap, racking up so much that you can hardly afford rent, groceries and other bills? Not everyone is eligible to transfer their benefits though, because the military is using this benefit as an incentive to get personnel to agree to slightly longer service contracts. If you leave the service too early, then your dependents lose their access to the benefits, and get stuck with a huge bill!

How to Gift Your GI Benefits to Your Spouse

Will you still be able to transfer your benefits? What effect will this have if you've already transferred your benefits? If you've been struggling with questions on the new rules, we've got you covered. The Defense Department requires service members to commit to serve an additional four years in the military in order to transfer GI Bill benefits to a dependent. How long must I serve to be able to transfer my GI Bill? Previously, DoD required troops to have served at least 6 years in order to request a GI Bill transfer. That requirement remains, and the Pentagon's new policy will also require that service members not have served more than 16 years. So you'll need between six and 16 years in uniform. Does this rule change affect me? The policy chance will not affect service members who have already transferred their GI Bill benefits, according to Jessica Maxwell, a DoD spokeswoman.

Wisconsin G.I. Bill Benefits

Bill to my dependents? Service members who have 16 or more years of military service as of July 12, are ineligible to make the election to transfer benefits. Bill Education Benefits to my eligible dependents, what is my obligated service requirement? Bill at the time of approval of his or her request to transfer that entitlement, may request to transfer that entitlement provided he or she has at least 6 years of military service on the date of election. The service member must agree to serve four additional years in the armed service.

There are certain limitations, and new rules passed in July, effective starting Jan 12, require members to transfer their GI bill no later than the end of their 16th year of service.

By Carl O. Other than sharing the purpose of helping veterans attain their education, and a similar name, they really have nothing in common. While the primary purpose is to help veterans after their military service, the GI Bill benefits are available to members still serving in the military, as well as family members. Military members attending school while on active duty are entitled to the tuition payments and book stipend, but not the monthly stipend.

Can I Transfer My GI Bill Benefits to My Wife or Husband?

Department of Veteran's Affairs VA. More information about educational benefits offered by the VA is available at the official U. Ron Kness retired from the military with 36 years of service.

This is your guide to understand how to transfer your GI Bill to your spouse and dependents. The goal of the GI Bill transfer program is to keep mid-career military members in uniform, which is why there are minimum service requirements and why the GI Bill transfer program requires military members to incur more service time. You can transfer your entitlement to your spouse, children, or both. If you get divorced, your ex-spouse can still use the transferred benefits; however, you can take away or change the transferred benefits at any time, depending on the divorce settlement. Yes, you may split the GI Bill Benefit between multiple family members, including yourself. The maximum limit is 36 months of benefit split any way.

Veterans Affairs Office

The Wisconsin G. Bill is a tuition remission program for eligible Wisconsin veterans, and certain children and spouses of eligible veterans, who are attending public institutions of higher education in Wisconsin. Bill is here Campus Veterans Coordinators. Important and up to date information about the Wisconsin G.. I Bill is contained in Frequently Asked Questions on this page. The Frequently Asked Questions have been split into two parts, one for those with service before September 10, and one for those with service following September 10,

Servicemembers have the opportunity to transfer GI Bill college benefits to qualifying A spouse can start using their entitlement immediately upon receiving Once logged in, click on the Transfer My Education Benefits from the I Want To.

Contacting us first helps us keep you safe. If the DoD approves the Transfer of Entitlement TOE , your spouse or dependent children can apply for up to 36 months of benefits, and may be able to get money for:. Your dependents may still qualify even if a child marries or you and your spouse divorce. However, service members and Veterans can revoke cancel or change a TOE at any time.

Education Opportunities for Military Spouses

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Transfer your Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits

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Transfer your GI Bill to Spouse and Dependents

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GI Bill Transfer Rules – Transfer your GI Bill Benefits to Your Spouse or Children

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